Sidepreneur

Tips for Taking Your Side Hustle Full-Time

Tips for Taking Your Side Hustle Full-Time

Well, let me start off by saying everything isn't for everybody. As you know from my last blog post, I rock with the side hustle. As a matter of fact, I rock with all forms of entrepreneurship (it's in my DNA), so let's not make that an issue. However, while we talk about sidepreneurs and validate their hustle, we don't always address the issue of transitioning from sidepreneur to full-time entrepreneur. Here are a few tips to help you decide when it's appropriate to take your side hustle full-time.

Can't Knock the Side Hustle

Can't Knock the Side Hustle

There's no perfect way to do anything, and there is usually more than one way to skin a cat. If you're going to ease into entrepreneurship by going the side hustle route until your business gains enough traction for you to be a full-time entrepreneur, these tips should help you get the most out of your efforts.

Don't Quit Your Day Job...Well, At Least Not Yet!

Don't Quit Your Day Job...Well, At Least Not Yet!

Maintaining a day job while pursuing startup or freelance opportunities can actually spur the success of your foray into the free work culture. How? Well, think about it this way: since startups can take anywhere from 3 to 5 years to become profitable, maintaining a steady income opportunity in the interim can allow you to invest in the development of your business while continuing to develop the skills and knowledge you'll need to ultimately make your business successful.

Avoiding a Working Retirement

Avoiding a Working Retirement

Have you ever noticed how many elderly people are still holding down jobs? I don't mean consulting jobs for which their expertise is paid a premium. I mean jobs that pay a pittance hovering around minimum wage. Look how many greeters at Walmart, for example, are old enough to be your grandmother - or great grandmother.

Don't Freelance for a Freeloader

Don't Freelance for a Freeloader

I think the free in freelance confuses people sometimes. It's kind of like the way many Americans understood the word entrepreneur in the 80's: they thought it was a French word that meant unemployed street hustler, thanks to Eddie Murphy's (in)famous SNL sketch.